Mingus in the Act: Confronting the Legacies of Vaudeville and Minstrelsy

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Mingus in the Act: Confronting the Legacies of Vaudeville and Minstrelsy
Jazz Perspectives
4
337-368
2010/10
eng
1749-4060, 1749-4079
This essay explores Charles Mingus as performer through the lens of vaudeville and minstrelsy entertainment legacies of earlier jazz performers, and particularly the careers of Jelly Roll Morton, Louis Armstrong, and Fats Waller, each of whom Mingus included in his list of a “heritage of traditions.” Within the context of the so‐called colorblind racial ideology of midcentury American jazz culture, the author examines Mingus’s critique of the jazz industry and of his mainly white audiences, to whom he explicitly and implicitly articulated black male performance identities in his writings, liner notes, lectures to audiences, spoken‐word compositions, and in, among other works, the compositions “Eat That Chicken” and “The Clown.”
3
Jazz Perspectives
10.1080/17494060.2010.561091
Mingus in the Act
2019-05-06T20:18:38Z
DOI.org (Crossref)